Short lived railway between Syracuse and Milford

Railroad history is interesting to me and northern Indiana has plenty of it. Several railroad lines have been abandoned, but were important in the history of transportation locally. One such railway never carried any passengers (though that was apparently promised at one time) and didn’t last very long, but it still has an interesting history. I’m referring to the Syracuse-Milford Railway in Kosciusko County. It formed in the early 1900s for the purpose of transporting marl between lakes in Syracuse and Waubee Lake near Milford. Marl was dug out of the bottom of lakes and used in the making of concrete. The railroad line, only about 6 total miles in length, went through the countryside between the two towns of Syracuse and Milford. Traces of it remain today, though they are limited. The tree line shown here is part of the old path of the railway. It is just off Syracuse-Webster Road, south of the “crazy corners” intersection near Syracuse. The route of the Syracuse-Milford Railway can still be found on a 1914 Kosciusko County Atlas. A short lived railway, and short in distance railway.

syr-mil-railway-syr-web-road-001

Path of the former Syracuse-Milford Railway near Syracuse.

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About historynut11

My name is Tim Ashley and I am a newspaper editor/reporter/photographer in Milford, Indiana, and live in nearby Goshen, Indiana. A deeply held and sincere passion of mine is history and learning from the past. I enjoy a wide variety of history topics, but particularly local history, noted American highways (Lincoln Highway and Route 66), railroad history and the Civil War. I believe we can learn much from the past and that past shapes who we are today. I also enjoy visiting museums and historical sites, as well as taking photos of remnants from the past still standing.
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